Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle

Artist Nir Hod Puzzle

Regular price $150 Unit price  per 

Nir Hod Website  

b.1970 | Lives and works in New York, NY, United States

Title: Genius

Live Video of Jigsaw Puzzle: Click Here

Jigsaw Puzzle Size:  (Horizontal) 12"x 16.5" (310mm×418mm) 285 Jigsaw Puzzle Pieces. Eska Premium Board.

This special puzzle is complex and engaging imagery that will keep you puzzling for hours!  

The Collector Edition arrives in a specially custom-made wood box engraved with Art X Puzzles.

Collector Edition of 20 + 2AP

Level: Challenging

Signature Details:

Continuing the artist’s longtime fascination with beauty and loneliness, glamour and death, Hod’s aristocratic young Geniuses inhabit a world of paradox, where their cherubic cheeks contrast with their scornful expressions and lit cigarettes. Philosopher Roy Brand describes them as “…little demons without disguises. But they are also yearning, beautiful, and charming, and their narcissism is more a sign of internal happiness than of vanity.” Like sculptures in a wax museum that aim to dramatically freeze time, these paintings explore art’s power to capture life while simultaneously elevating it to depict an unattainable ideal.

Entitled ‘Genius’, new paintings and sculpture from Hod’s series of precocious and melancholic young men and women. 

Hod’s bronze “Genius” sculpture accentuates the vulnerability of these child prodigies by pairing the knowing expressions and eerie self-possession of the painted Geniuses with the sculpture’s diminutive body. His ashtray sculpture—in which a cigarette smolders alongside the music wafting from an abandoned telephone receiver— furthers the exhibition’s aura of decadent fantasy. In the nearly life-sized “Father and Son” sculpture, a father kneels before his domineering son, embracing him with a gesture that seems equally affectionate and fearful. For Hod, this work illustrates a less literal usage of the word “Genius,” wherein extravagant behavior creates a cult of personality, like the ones surrounding dictators, celebrity eccentrics or Mafioso.

As Richard Vine wrote in the catalogue for Hod’s survey exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, “From the beginning of his career, Nir Hod has opposed the ideology that labels sumptuousness an esthetic sin. His work openly substitutes the pleasure principle and a fluid multiplicity of selves for the old notions of high seriousness and personal authenticity. ”

Entitled Genius, new paintings and sculpture from Hod’s series of precocious and melancholic young men and women. For more on Genius Series:  Click here  

Artist Certificate: Each puzzle comes with an artist certificate.

Biography:

There is a thin line — and sometimes numerous (white) lines — that marks the division between terror and glamour. A step too far in one direction and you’re down a rabbit hole of narcissistic hedonism; edge just beyond the brink in another and you’re in a world of autocratic atrocities. This paradox between surface and substance, polish and patina, capitalists and despots is what drives — and has always driven — the work of Nir Hod. A painter at his core, Hod has long been obsessed with honoring the technical mastery of his idols only to subvert them in polemical and political narratives that suggest a new world order that is just slightly askew: be it oil renderings of cocaine on obsidian mirrors referencing loss over lust; portraits of toddlers rendered with Old Master virtuosity disrupted by the addition of smoldering cigarettes in their hands; Dutch Golden Age style still-life paintings of tumescent orchids engulfed in Richteresque flames; or a haloed woman carrying a handbag — part Warhol ”Shadow Painting”; part luxury glamazon — isolated from the terrified ”Warsaw Ghetto Boy” in the iconic image of a Nazi roundup by SS photographer Franz Konrad.

For his recent series, The Life We Left Behind, Hod upends Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray by means of mirrored abstractions that begin with heavily labored gradient under paintings invoking the sublime sunsets of J.M.W. Turner which the artist cancels with a chroming technique first developed by the US Navy in 1939. He then degrades this finish fetish application via air pressure, water, ammonia and various acids to create a surface tension between newfangled industrial applications and age-old oil technique. It’s a series of vertical landscapes that map the rifts between vanity and venality as much as they mimic the patina of our decaying infrastructure (bridges, tunnels, waterways) that once supported life but now serve as ruins for modern-day ghost towns. Hod implicates the viewer as an agent in these lustrous action paintings, an abstract figure reflecting metaphors on their own conspicuous relationships with luxury and nature within the formal boundaries of their own distorted representation. In the age of Instagram, Hod’s chromed canvases shine a light on the true, unfiltered image of a generation who has staged so many self-portraits it can literally no longer recognize itself.


Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle
Artist Nir Hod Puzzle